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Welcome to City of York


York was known as Eboracum by the Romans, who founded the fortress city on the River Ouse in the year 71. York was home first to the Ninth Legion and later the Sixth. York quickly became one of the most important cities in Roman Britain, and after 211 became the capital of the province Britannia Inferior. Constantine the GreatŚlater responsible for making Christianity the official religion of the Roman EmpireŚwas first proclaimed Emperor in the city.

Captured by the Vikings 866, the city quickly took on a new identity as Jorvik (pronounced "Yor-vik") and experienced a major urban revival as a centre of Viking trade and settlement in northern England. The Coppergate excavations of the 1970s revealed much of this Viking past.

York is a fairly small city - four days is enough to see the major sights although York is a city that reveals its charms to explorers with curiosity and patience.

York is known as England's "City of Festivals" as there are regular cultural festivals every year. The official festivals are the Viking Festival, the Festival of Angels, Early Music, Late Music, Horse Racing (the "Ebor Race Meeting"), Multicultural Food and Arts, Chinese New Year, Mystery Plays, Christmas St Nicholas' Fair, and the Food and Drink Festival. It's a romantic city for a weekend break. York is full of magic and a wonderful place to bring children!

 

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Sightseeing Of York


 

Battle of Fulford 1066 tour, +44 (0)7877 781003 +44 (0)7877 781003 (admin@ibattles.co.uk), . In 1066 the greatest shield wall battle in world history took place - no, not the Battle of Hastings, but in fact the Battle of Fulford, fought just outside York on the 20th September 1066, just a few weeks before Hastings. Discover the background to 1066, including the great last Viking invasion of England, and the foul deeds and bloody history surrounding the monarchy at the time. A full tour of the battlefield is given by representatives from the ibattles website, who have made a fascinating drama documentary about the battle (a copy is included free with each tour - a great memento of your visit to York or gift for a loved one). Please note the battle site is just a 5 minute drive by car from the city centre, transport can be arranged if required.

 

York Minster, +44 (0)1904 557216 +44 (0)1904 557216 , . M-Sa 9AM-5PM Su noon-3:45PM. The largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe, York Minster dominates the skyline & has a history of building that dates back to the 8th century at least. The one place that everybody visits. Stay for Evensong service if you can, especially if you've never been to a church service before. Adult £5.50, concession £4.50, child under 16 free.

 

Jorvik Viking Centre, ? +44 (0)1904 543400 +44 (0)1904 543400 (jorvik@yorkat.co.uk), . Daily 10AM-4PM (winter), 10AM-5PM (summer). An amazing recreation of the Viking settlement at York, on the site of the Coppergate archaeological excavations of the 1970s. Not to be missed, some say, while others are much less enthusiastic. Bear in mind this lasts approx 15mins, not something for the day out, and works out roughly £2 every 5 mins, you may be queued for longer than you are actually in there. £6 and upwards.

 

National Railway Museum (National Railway Museum), Leeman Road, +44 (0)870 4214001 +44 (0)870 4214001 (nrm@nrm.org.uk), . Daily 10AM-6PM. The largest railway museum in the world, responsible for the conservation and interpretation of the British national collection of historically significant railway vehicles and other artefacts. Contains an unrivalled collection of locomotives, rolling stock, railway equipment, documents and records.

 

York Castle Museum, Eye of York (next to Clifford's Tower), +44 (0)1904 687687 +44 (0)1904 687687 . Daily 9:30AM-5PM. An award winning museum of everyday life with exhibitions to appeal to all ages. Exhibits include Kirkgate, a Victorian street; Half Moon Court, an Edwardian street; and costumes and toys through the ages. Built in part of the former prison there is also an opportunity to explore the old cells and see where Dick Turpin spent his last days. Adult £8, concession £7, child free with adult.

 

Ruins of St Mary's Abbey, Museum Gardens (near Minster). A great place for a picnic.

 

King's Manor, . Now part of the University of York, previously a royal headquarters,

 

Clifford's Tower, +44 (0)1904 646940 +44 (0)1904 646940 . Daily 10AM-4PM. This imposing "tower" represents the medieval castle of York, located in the centre of town, originally built by William the Conqueror to subdue the rebellious north, then rebuilt by Henry III in the 13th century. Fantastic panoramic views of York and the surrounding countryside from the top of the tower. £2.50.

 

Merchant Adventurers' Hall, Fossgate, +44 (0)1904 654818 +44 (0)1904 654818 . M-Th 9AM-5PM F-Sa 9AM-3:30PM Su noon-4PM. Built 1357-1361 and of international importance, this building is Europe's finest medieval Guildhall and scheduled as an ancient monument. Nowhere else can be seen in one building the three rooms serving the three functions of a medieval guild: business, charity and religion. Above is the superb timbered Great Hall, below is the Undercroft or Hospital and Chapel. Audi guides available. Adult £2.50.

 

Eboracum Legion Bathhouse (Roman Bath public house), St Sampson's Square, +44 (0)1904 620455 +44 (0)1904 620455 . Daily 10AM-5PM. A great venue for food, drink and entertainment - complete with a Roman period bathhouse in the cellar. One of York's oldest attractions, visitors can see the remains of ancient York, with insights into Roman military life and hygiene. Adult £2.

 

York Dungeon, . Entertaining, though perhaps not for the faint hearted or for young children, there is little blood or gore, and some may find it suitable for children. Definitely worth the entrance price, however check out the pubs beforehand, as you may find 2 for 1 beer mats in the Kings Arms, a pub on the banks of the River Ouse near the Yorkboat landing (Kings Straith).

 

Yorkshire Museum, Museum Gardens (near Minster), . Interesting, and quite good for curious children. Features displays of Roman, Viking and Medieval riches.

 

York Maze, (next to Grimston Bar park and ride so by car or bus), . A very large maze (the largest in the world, they say) and it's made of maize. Give it at least a couple of hours. There are other activities, such as a mini-maze for children, and games (such as Crazy Mazey Golf). Only open during the summer months.

 

Treasurer's House, . National Trust operated town house dating from Medieval times.

 

Barley Hall, Coffee Yard, . A lovingly restored Medieval townhouse, situated on Coffee Yard (an alley off Stonegate). Hidden gem.