Home » Montenegro-travel-guide » Tips

Montenegro Tourist Information and Tips



Eat

Apart from the hotels located in towns and summer resorts offering half-board and full-board accommodation, and those along the roads and communication lines such as restaurants, pizza places, taverns, fast food restaurants and cafes, there is a choice of national restaurants offering traditional Montenegrin cuisine.

In addition to the standard European and Mediterranean cuisine, Montenegro offers a variety of healthy food products and local specialities.

Cold hors-d'oeuvres include the famous njeguski prsut (smoked ham) and njeguski cheese , pljevaljski cheese , mushrooms, donuts and dried bleak. The main courses specific for the northern mountainous region are boiled lamb, lamb cooked in milk, cicvara in fresh milk cream (buttered corn porridge), boiled potatoes with cheese and fresh cream. A selection of traditional recipes of the central and coastal parts will include the kastradina (dried mutton), smoked and fresh carp (from Skadar lake) and a variety of fresh sea fish and seafood dishes. Donuts served with honey and dried figs are traditional desserts in these parts of Montenegro.

Products of animal origin are supervised and approved by veterinary and health authorities according to EU standards.

Drink

Wine

Montenegrin vineyards and the production of quality wine is part of the tradition of southern and coastal wine makers.

The best known Montenegrin wines are the premium whites: "Krstac", "Cabernet", "Chardonnay" and reds: "Vranac", "Pro Corde". All of them are produced by the famous company "Plantaze", but there's also some home-made wines of high quality, like Crmnicko wine.

1L bottle of "Vranac" red wine will cost you from 8 to 15 in the bar or restaurant and it is well worth it! Also, you can buy a bottle of "Plantaze"'s wine for about 2-4 in supermarkets.

Brandy

The continental region and north are more oriented towards the production of aromatic fruit flavoured brandy (plum brandy - sljivovica, apple brandy - jabukovaca). Grape brandy "Montenegrin loza", "Prvijenac", "Kruna" or home made grape brandy (lozova rakija, lozovaca) is a must-try, and a good choice to "warm up" before going out in the evening.

Beer

"Niksicko" beer is the best known beer in the Montenegro, and most common alcoholic beverage, which cost from 1.00 to 2.50. It is produced as a draught beer, or bottled, in both "Nik Gold" and lighter "Nik Cool" variant. Dark variant, "Nik tamno", is praised among beer lovers.

 

Stay safe

Montenegro is generally a safe country. There is, like all countries in the world, a number of criminal activities, but police forces are generally fast in their duties. The number is 122, as well as the international distress call 112. When travelling in the areas bordering Kosovo it is recommended you keep to the main roads. Unexploded landmines may remain along the Kosovo border. You should also avoid areas where there is military activity.

In the resort towns such as Kotor, Budva, Sveti Stefan and Herceg Novi, beggars and pickpockets are not uncommon. Don't be afraid of giving them a couple euro-cents, but do not ever let them see that you possess a lot of money or something valuable, as they will send someone after you to beg for more money. Always carry your bags in the safest way, slung around your shoulder with the pouch on the front of your leg where you can see it. If you see a boy or girl running in your direction and you're holding an object, put it out of the way until he/she passes by, as they may try to knock it out of your hand.

Respect

Short pants are usually not permitted inside the public institutions (hospitals, etc). Wear modest dress when visiting monasteries and churches.

At beaches, taking off the bottom piece of a swimsuit will likely create a stir, and is generally reserved for designated nude beaches.

Being visibly drunk is a sign of bad taste and character in Montenegro: You may be invited to drink gallons, but are expected to be able to hold your drink. People also usually prefer to sip their liquor instead of emptying it in "bottoms-up" style. Be careful, "rakija" a plum spirit (usually about 53% alcohol content), is stronger than expected, and will make you drunk fast!

Source: Wikitravel.org